Monthly Archives: November 2014

The Challenge for 2015

The truth is that I have set myself the target of doing some triathlon before I’m 60 in November 2015. Not just any old triathlon – an Ironman. I have entered the Weymouth Challenge in September 2015. I have also entered the Bristol Harbourside standard triathlon in June 2015 as a warm up.

Bristol Harbourside triathlon

Bristol Harbourside triathlon

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Eating Words

I previously wrote in this blog that triathlon was not really going to interest me. I have changed my mind. I am eating those words.

Trepidation at last years middle distance triathlon

Trepidation at last years middle distance triathlon

Followed by exhilaration at the same event

Followed by exhilaration at the same event

I also wrote that the marathon I ran in 2009 was almost definitely my last one. It’s looking as if it won’t be.

London Marathon 2009 (excuse the informal dress)

London Marathon 2009 (excuse the informal dress)

In June 2013 after finishing the middle distance – or half iron man – triathlon I wrote

“It is an experience I am delighted to have had, but one which I do not intend to repeat”

Yes you’ve got it – more words to be eaten!

Finishing the middle distance triathlon

Finishing the middle distance triathlon – not looking that comfortable!

More triathlon(s) and more marathon(s)

The Jurassic Coast

I am very fortunate to live beside the sea in Dorset. The region contains some fantastic coastal scenery. The variety of coastal landscapes is a result of the region’s complex geology.

November has been quite stormy so far, but Saturday 15th November was scheduled to be an Isle of Portland Canoe Club trip and we were very fortunate with the weather. The wind dropped, it was warm and the sun even shone, some of the time.

We paddled the section of coast from Ringstead to Lulworth Cove. Ringstead is a convenient spot to start from as it has a car park and a slipway to the beach. In the summer there is also a cafe and some toilets.

Husband and I before launching at Ringstead

Husband and I before launching at Ringstead

We paddled across Ringstead bay with the Isle of Portland as a backdrop.

Ringstead Bay with Portland behind

Ringstead Bay with Portland behind

As we rounded White Nothe, the spectacular chalk cliffs of the coastline towards Durdle Door came into view. This is the start of the white cliffs of the Purbeck coast.

White Nothe

White Nothe

The next landmark is Bats Hole which is a tiny tunnel through the headland known as Bats Head, closely followed by the spectacular Durdle Door.

Durdle Door

Durdle Door

More spectacular cliff formations follow at Stair Hole. The folded limestone strata here are known as the Lulworth Crumple and there are several caves visible from the seaward side.

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Bats Head

Bats Head

It was quite lively due to the residual swell forming clapotis. Once inside stairhole it was quite calm.

And so, onto Lulworth Cove – our lunch stop. Lulworth Cove is one of the UK’s most popular scenic attractions. A gap has been eroded though the limestone cliffs by the waves and a bay has been sculpted from the softer rock behind. There were plenty of visitors at Lulworth Cove despite it being the middle of November and the ice cream shop was closed.

A little wave forms at the entrance to Lulworth Cove due to shallow water from a rock bar. Its possible to get airborne if you get the timing right.

Nearly airborne

Nearly airborne

The return trip to Ringstead was very pleasant and quite uneventful as we enjoyed the spectacular cliff scenery from an alternative angle.

Cliff fall from April 2013

Cliff fall from April 2013

Deviation

People are naturally given to change so deviation is normal.

Over the last year or so I have ridden more long distance events. I expected to enjoy pushing the boundaries of time spent on my bike and distance travelled in a ride. In May 2014 after I did a 300km Audax ride I knew that I was not going to enjoy doing another one and that riding even further was not something I would enjoy. I continued riding Audax events to the end of the Audax year in September as there were certain challenges I had set myself.

Since then I have had a good think about stuff I would like to achieve before I am 60 in November 2015.

I started running properly in 1989. I joined a Club and started doing local races; I competed in the Dorset Road running league. I ran my first London Marathon in 1994. I was a runner almost exclusively for the best part of 22 years. All the time my children were growing up I found time to run and race. I loved it. But, my body was starting to object, especially my knees, so in 2009 I stopped running so much and although I have kept running a little bit, I haven’t gone to running club and I haven’t really raced. I have become a jogger. My running had become non–competitive, less serious, less strenuous, much slower and requiring less effort. I still had a nice time but I was definitely jogging.

Something happened. At the beginning of September my 3rd daughter Kathryn, now 26, did a half ironman. I supported. (This is not merely going along to the event and shouting ’good effort’ as she ran past but involved getting up at 4am and feeding her porridge for starters). When we got home she rested and I went out for a jog – but it turned into a run because I didn’t want to be a jogger anymore.

Crucially my body having had several years rest from running seems to have recovered. My knees don’t hurt anymore. I have lost all my running speed and fitness. Running is significantly harder on the body than the sort of cycling I have been doing. I have retained some cardiovascular fitness from the cycling but my running is much slower than it used to be. This is not something which I accept and will work hard to get quicker.

Through September I gradually increased the running and by the beginning of October hill reps and tempo runs were beginning to feature in my life again.

On 12th October I ran the Mendip Muddle. This is a hilly off road 20km race. The course is tough (there’s 420m of climb) and set in some fine scenery around Cheddar in Somerset.

The Mendip Muddle

The Mendip Muddle

I enjoyed the race very much and did alright.

The following weekend I ran the Weymouth 10. The race is organised by Egdon Heath Harriers – which I have now re-joined – and starts and finishes on Weymouth sea front.

On Weymouth seafront in the Weymouth 10

Some runners from Egdon Heath Harriers on Weymouth seafront in the Weymouth 10

I last ran this race in 2004. This time it seemed seemed like a very long way. Crucially, even 20 minutes further back in the field than I used to be – I was still racing. Striving hard to catch that person in front and get away from them. I managed to beat my target of 90 minutes – but only just. This was not as much fun as a hilly off road race and to be honest was jolly hard work.10606511_10153544565049897_7922545876207030480_n

Running hard in the Weymouth 10

Running hard in the Weymouth 10

The following weekend I headed up to North Dorset for the 20th Stickler. This race is 10.1 miles of hilly Dorset countryside including the infamous ‘stickle path’, Okeford Beacon, Hod Hill and Hambeldon Hill.

During The Stickler

During The Stickler

I last did this race in 2007 and was delighted to be only 6 minutes slower 7 years later. I loved it. Off road and hilly is a lot of fun.

At the finish of The Stickler

At the finish of The Stickler

Which brings me up to date. Yesterday was the Gilly Hilly. I last ran this while introducing Kathryn to racing back in 2006 when she was only 17.

The Gilly Hilly in 2006 running with Kathryn

The Gilly Hilly in 2006 running with Kathryn

I ran hard and competitively and was pleased to have trimmed 20 seconds a mile off my speed in the 2 weeks since the Weymouth 10. So, all good.

Finishing the Gilly Hilly in 2014

Finishing the Gilly Hilly in 2014

I am very excited about the running again. It’s that fabled runners high. It may only be chemicals shooting around in my brain but it’s feeling pretty good right now. I am still riding my bike and have renewed enjoyment from that now I have removed the long distance targets from my ambitions. My bike rides are now mostly reduced in time from all day rides to a few hours which leaves much more time for running – and swimming.

But more about that in another post.