Day 12: Carlton Bank to Lion Inn

We got a lift from our Hotel back to Carlton Bank.

From the car park there is a good path which climbs steeply to the top of Cringle Moor. The main problem for us was grouse. There were hundreds of grouse chicks which Archie wanted to kill. Vital energy was spent restraining him!

Cringle Moor was for centuries a place of work with Alum mining being the main occupation. The Moor is a high elevation with great views.

Cringle Moor with fine views to Roseberry Topping. Also note the well made path – a sure sign we are still on a National Trail - the Cleveland Way

Cringle Moor with fine views to Roseberry Topping. Also note the well made path – a sure sign we are still on a National Trail – the Cleveland Way

The path continues to the Wainstones. A cluster of fanged and pinnacled rocks.

The Wainstones

The Wainstones

This is a change from the heather and bracken and found us scrambling between the buttresses to the easy ground above.

The Wainstones

The Wainstones

At Clay Bank Top the B1257 crosses a natural pass in the hills. It links Stokesley with Helmsley. The high traverse of the Cleveland Hills continues with the next stage across Urra Moor. There is an old road across the top of Urra Moor and Hand Stones line the road across the featureless moor.

Urra Moor

Urra Moor

The walk along the ancient highway across Urra Moor is very pleasant on a calm sunny day.

The ancient highway with inscribed stones at the side and with some of the original paving occasionally visible descends gradually to the old railway at Bloworth Crossing.

The Cleveland Way now turns off to the north and the C2C follows the old railway through cuttings and embankments rounding the head of Farndale.

The C2C goes around the head of Farndale. The moor to the sides of the railway is impenetrable with bogs and heather

The C2C goes around the head of Farndale. The moor to the sides of the railway is impenetrable with bogs and heather

The old railway track across High Blakey Moor

The old railway track across High Blakey Moor

At a curve in the last railway cutting the Lion Inn on Blakey Ridge comes into view on the skyline ahead. The Inn dates back to 1553 and is situated amongst the decaying relics of industry.

Today its patrons are no longer iron workers and coal miners but tourists and walkers.

Fine beer at the Lion Inn

Fine beer at the Lion Inn

20 km with 600m of elevation.

The GPX file for the route that we followed is here.